August 17, 2018
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By Caitlin Hardeman

EL Support Lesson

Adjectives: Comparative and Superlative

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Nonfiction Comprehension: Compare and ContrastLesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Nonfiction Comprehension: Compare and ContrastLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to compare and contrast information from two nonfiction texts on the same topic.

Language

Students will be able to compare and contrast with comparative and superlative adjectives using peer support.

(3 minutes)
  • Show students items, or images of items, that come in small, medium, and large sizes, such as coffee cups. Ask students to use words to describe the items. Ask them to think about what is the same and what is different about the items. Have them discuss with a partner before sharing with the class.
  • Tell learners that today's lesson will be about using adjective forms to describe how things compare to each other.
(10 minutes)
  • Introduce the Vocabulary Card for the word Adjective. Read aloud the word, definition, and provide examples.
  • Give each student a copy of the Graphic Organizer Template: Frayer Model worksheet, and explain what each section of the graphic organizer requires. Instruct them to write the word AdjectiveIn the section labeled Vocabulary Term.
  • Put students into partnerships and provide them with support as they complete the graphic organizer.
  • Call on students to share the information from each section and create a teacher copy to display as a reference for the remainder of the lesson.
  • Introduce the remaining two words, ComparativeAnd Superlative, using the Vocabulary Cards. Read aloud each word and definition. Explain that these are two types of adjectives, and provide examples of each (e.g., comparative - bigger, larger, smaller, louder; superlative - biggest, largest, smallest, loudest).
  • Draw a T-Chart on the board, with one side for comparative adjectives and the other side for superlative adjectives. Prompt students to think of additional comparative and superlative words. Have them share with the class and record them on the chart. Point out the -er in comparative adjectives and the -est in the superlative adjectives.
(18 minutes)
  • Distribute a copy of the Using Comparative and Superlative Adjectives worksheet to each student. Go over the first page and ask students to suggest additional examples of comparative and superlative forms of adjectives that fit each rule. Record them on the teacher copy and have students record additional examples on their worksheets.
  • Model identifying the comparative adjective in the first example in Part 1 of the worksheet. Point out that the adjective ends with the -er, and note the two things that are being compared in the sentence (e.g., his bike is being compared to my bike). Have students complete the remainder of Part 1 with a partner. Have them discuss the two things that are being compared. Go over it as a class.
  • Think aloud and model identifying the superlative adjective in the first example in Part 2. Emphasize that the adjective ends with -est, and point out the things that are being compared (e.g., his bike is being compared to all the other bikes). Challenge students to complete the rest of the section, discussing what is being compared in each sentence. Check answers together as a class.
  • Explain that the third section of the worksheet requires students to utilize the rules on the first page. They will form the comparative or superlative form of the adjective in parenthesis. They must pay attention to the context of the sentence to determine if it's only two things that are being compared (comparative) or if it is three or more things being compared (superlative). Guide students through the first few examples before releasing them to work in partnerships. Engage them in discussion about the context in each sentence and what is being compared. Go over the answers and discuss as a class.
  • No discourse focus for this lesson plan.

BEGINNING

  • Allow access to reference materials in home language (L1).
  • Have learners repeat instructions and key vocabulary to the teacher.
  • Pre-teach a lesson on identifying and using adjectives.

ADVANCED

  • Allow learners to utilize glossaries and dictionaries for unfamiliar words.
  • Choose advanced ELs to share their ideas first in group and class discussions.
  • Have learners repeat instructions and key vocabulary, summarizing important information for the class.
(5 minutes)
  • Instruct students to complete Part 4 of the Using Comparative and Superlative Adjectives worksheet independently. Allow them to use the rest of the worksheet as a reference as they complete the sentence frames.
(4 minutes)
  • Pair students together and have them share Part 4 of the Using Comparative and Superlative Adjectives worksheet. Share out as a class to make sure students have the correct information.
  • Review that using comparative and superlative adjectives is a way that we can make comparisons. These words are types of adjectives that give information about how items relate to each other.

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