June 1, 2018
|
By April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Emotion Charades

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Mad, Sad, Happy, Glad: Character FeelingsLesson plan.
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Mad, Sad, Happy, Glad: Character FeelingsLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to identify feelings by using a variety of words.

Language

Students will be able to identify feelings with adjectives using a word bank.

(4 minutes)
  • Access prior knowledge of emotions by showing a photograph of someone crying. Write the word "emotions" underneath the photograph.
  • Ask students what the picture shows and how the picture relates to the word emotions. Allow a few students to offer responses.
  • Explain EmotionsTo students by saying, "Emotions are feelings. Our feelings change from moment to moment depending on whats going on around us, at home, or with our friends. Can anyone tell me an emotion that they felt today?"
  • Encourage students to offer responses and record them on the whiteboard. Explain to the students that today they will be playing emotion charades and learning new vocabulary words to describe emotions.
  • Explain that learning a variety of words to describe emotions, or how someone is feeling, will help them to understand how characters are feeling in the stories they read.
(8 minutes)
  • Put students in small groups and pass out the labeled notecards and the Vocabulary Cards to each group.
  • Ask a volunteer to read the words on the notecards.
  • Think aloud by saying, "Hmmm...adjective...I've heard that word before, but I can't remember what it is. Can someone help me?"
  • Allow a few students to offer their ideas. If no one has the correct answer, remind them that an AdjectiveDescribes something.
  • Ask students to stand up and repeat the following chant with movement:
    • An ad-jec-tive (clap three times) describes (point to hair) some (pull shirt) thing (pull skirt or pants).
  • Call on a few students to offer examples of adjectives.
  • Give the students a couple minutes to sort the vocabulary cards into adjectives and non-adjectives. When the students are finished, call on a non-volunteer to share their answers.
  • Explain to the students that emotions vocabulary, or feelings, are all adjectives because they describe how someone is feeling. Provide an example sentence on the whiteboard: "The angry woman stomped to her car." Circle the word angry. Say, "Angry is an adjective because angry describes how the woman is feeling as she stomps to her car."
(8 minutes)
  • Gather students in a circle and show students the Emotions Dice. Read the words on each side.
  • Pass out the Word Bank: Emotion Charades worksheet and explain that there are certain emotion words that mean the same thing. These words are called Synonyms.
  • Read through the visual word bank with the students, calling attention to the pictures that students can use for support.
  • Explain to the student that today, in small groups, they will be playing emotion charades.
  • On the board, write the sentence stem, "____Feels ____Because ____."
  • Model throwing the dice, looking at the word without showing anyone else, and acting out the emotion. For example, if the dice lands on excited, jump up and down excitedly. Next, ask the students if they know what emotion you are acting out.
  • Call on a student to offer a response, reminding the student to use the sentence stem in the answer. For example, "Ms. Brown feels excited because she is jumping up and down and smiling." Challenge the student to find one of the synonyms for the word excited (animated or enthusiastic). Clarify any confusion about the meaning of the emotion the student describes.
  • Call on a student and have the student model the same process in front of peers.
(10 minutes)
  • Put the students in small groups and have them play the game together. Encourage the students to use each word on the word bank only once, making note of the words they already used with a small check mark or star.
  • Remind students to use the sentence stem while discussing the emotions with each other.

BEGINNING

  • Provide beginning ELs with home language support and instructions.
  • Pair beginning ELs with sympathetic non-ELs.
  • Allow ELs to use their visuals of the vocabulary meanings and sentence frames in their discussions.

ADVANCED

  • Encourage students to use a bilingual dictionary to find another synonym for each word on their word bank.
  • Have students describe how the student is feeling without using the sentence frame.
(5 minutes)
  • Write the following higher level thinking question on the board:
    • Why do we need to know feeling words when talking about people or characters in a story?
  • Ask students to turn and share their answers with a neighbour.
  • Have students open their journals or reading logs and write and respond to the following sentence starter: "Learning new feeling words will help me ____."
  • Collect journals to assess how well students understood the purpose of learning new emotions vocabulary.
(5 minutes)
  • Reiterate to the students that learning a variety of words to describe emotions, or how someone is feeling, will help them to understand how characters are feeling in the stories they read.
  • Have the students choral chant the learning objective for the day: "I can identify feelings with adjectives using a word bank."
  • Divide students into two groups. One group is the inside circle and the other group forms the outside circle. Have students pair up with students in the opposing circle and face one another.
  • Write the following sentence starter on the board:
    • Something new I learned today was ____.
  • Ask the inside circle to respond to the sentence starter first. After a minute, have students reverse roles and the outside partners respond.
  • Circulate around the circles and listen to comments.
  • Use the information to guide further planning.

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