June 2, 2018
|
By April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Making Predictions and Summarizing

No ratings yet
Download lesson plan
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Summaries and PredictionsLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Summaries and PredictionsLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to make predictions and summarize a fictional text.

Language

Students will be able to make predictions and summarize a fictional text with transition words using a sequencing activity and paragraph frame.

(2 minutes)
  • Activate prior knowledge of predictions by modeling a scenario that fits your class routine/culture. For example, act as if you are getting ready to administer a test, do a craft, or something similar. Have students make a guess as to what will happen next based on one or two pieces of evidence.
  • Write the following sentence frame on the board:
    • Based on ____, I believe that ____Will happen next.
  • Allow students to share their ideas and record them on the whiteboard.
  • Explain that today they will be learning to recognise how transition words support us in making predictions and summarizing short fictional texts.
  • Call on a volunteer to read the learning goal for the day: "I can make predictions and summarize a fictional text with transition words using a sequencing activity and paragraph frame."
  • Call on a volunteer to find the transition word (next) in the sentence frame you wrote on the board.
(10 minutes)
  • Define the vocabulary words as a whole group, illiciting ideas from the students. Show visuals from the vocabulary cards and discuss how the visual connects to the vocabulary word.
  • Post the Frayer Model worksheets around the room and remind students how to complete the models.
  • Begin a carousel activity by separating students into small groups and asking them to rotate from one Frayer Model to another. Give each group a colored marker to add pictures, thoughts, sentences, and brief notes about vocabulary words from the lesson.
  • Ask each group to go back to their desks with one of the completed Frayer Models. Have them share their interpretations of the pictures, thoughts, sentences, and brief notes on their chosen vocabulary word.
  • Write the following sentence frames on the board to provide support as students orally share their ideas:
    • The word ____Means ____.
    • There is a picture of a ____, and I think that connects to the word ____Because ____.
(10 minutes)
  • Keep the students in small groups and explain to them that the words they just learned will be in the fictional text they will read next. Tell the students that the story they will read also has transition words and phrases. Call on a few volunteers to offer examples of transition words and phrases, using them in a complete sentence. Say, "Transition phrases help us understand what happens first, second, third, and last in a story. Transition phrases are important because we can use them to understand what we read and they also help us retell a story."
  • Write a few sentences from the I Can Make Predictions and Summarize Text worksheet on the board. Give the students a few minutes to circle or highlight the transition words in the sentences. Allow a few students to share answers and make connections to the brainstormed list on the board.
  • Keep students in their small groups and explain to them that they are going to play sequencing charades, the same activity you played in the beginning of the lesson. Have students think about a familiar routine from their day. For example, brushing teeth in the morning, eating breakfast, riding a bike to school, playing with friends, or eating dinner. Write the following example on the board:
    • First, Ms. Brown rubbed her eyes and brushed her teeth. Next, Ms. Brown read a story. Finally, I predict Ms. Brown will go to sleep because she is tired and getting ready for bed.
  • Reiterate the importance of using transition words when retelling what a student is acting out and predicting what will happen next. Write the following paragraph frame on the board to support students as they play the game and share out orally to their peers:
    • First, ____. Next, ____. Finally, I predict ____Because ____.
(10 minutes)
  • Distribute different paragraphs from the I Can Make Predictions and Summarize Text worksheet to each small group (everyone in the group should have the same paragraph), and briefly define SummaryAnd PredictionUsing student-friendly language.
  • Give students a few moments to read their paragraphs. Next, ask them to collaborate to write a prediction about what they think will happen next in the story and record it on their paragraph slip.
  • Put students in new groupings by giving each small group a letter (A, B, C, D). Remind students to remember their letter, grab their paragraph slip, and scramble to find new group members. Each previous group should be represented in the new grouping. For example, each group will have someone from group A, B, C, and D.
  • Give each student time to read their prediction to their group members.
  • Explain to the students that their next task is to put the paragraph slips in order from beginning to end. Everyone should have a different paragraph slip. On the board, write and read the following directions:
    • Read each paragraph.
    • Use transition words to sequence paragraphs from beginning to end.
    • Re-read the story to see if it makes sense.
    • Discuss if your predictions were right or wrong, using the following sentence frame:
      • My prediction was ____Based on ____.

BEGINNING

  • Repeat directions in student's L1.
  • Allow students to refer to their bilingual glossary during the word level activity.
  • Pair students with a sympathetic non-EL student.
  • Allow students to draw a picture of their prediction in the reading log or journal.
  • Allow students to refer to the correctly sequenced summary (paragraph slips in order) during the formative assessment.

ADVANCED

  • Encourage students to paraphrase directions for each activity and repeat ideas back to the peers in their groups.
  • Encourage students to write a prediction in their own words, without the use of the sentence frame during the formative assessment.
(5 minutes)
  • Pass out the paragraph frames from page two of the I Can Make Predictions and Summarize Text worksheets. Ask students to get out their reading logs or journals and coloring materials. Give students time to complete the paragraph frame independently, referencing the sequenced summary of the story if needed. After the summary is complete, ask students to make a brief prediction about what will happen next to the ugly duckling and beastly bird. Write the following sentence frame on the board:
    • Based on ____I predict ____Will happen next.
  • When students are finished, allow them to create illustrations of their finished summary.
  • Have students turn in their reading logs or journals to assess their understanding of the learning goal.
(3 minutes)
  • Have students turn and talk to their neighbour, answering one of the following questions or prompts:
    • Why are transition words important to use in summaries and predictions?
    • Make a prediction about what we will do next in class.
    • Using at least two of the vocabulary words from today, retell the story to your friend!
  • Say the learning goal, "I can make predictions and summarize a fictional text with transition words using a sequencing activity and paragraph frame," and ask students to rate themselves with the following rate scale: thumbs up (I get it), thumbs to the side (I'm still learning), thumbs down (I need more time to learn).
  • Use their responses to inform decisions about future mini lessons on transition words, predictions, and summaries in the future.

Add to collection

Create new collection

Create new collection

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely

What could we do to improve Education.com?

Please note: Use the Contact Us link at the bottom of our website for account-specific questions or issues.

What would make you love Education.com?

What is your favorite part about Education.com?