February 24, 2019
|
By April Brown

EL Support Lesson

More, Less, or the Same?

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Greater Than, Less Than: Comparing Three-Digit NumbersLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Greater Than, Less Than: Comparing Three-Digit NumbersLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of hundreds, tens, and ones, using symbols.

Language

Students will be able to explain why a three-digit number is greater than, less than, or equal to another three-digit number with academic vocabulary using a word bank and graphic organizer for support.

(5 minutes)
  • Project the Alligator Greater Than, Less Than song on the wall or whiteboard using a computer. Explain to the students that you are going to play a song about an alligator who likes to eat numbers.
  • Pass out the I Notice, I Wonder, I Learned worksheet to each student. Provide students with pencils to use to record their ideas.
  • Explain to the students that as they watch the video, you want them to think about something they notice or wonder. Play the video and pause every so often to model "noticing" and "wondering" things about the video (e.g. I wonder why the alligator ____? I notice that the alligator ____. I wonder what ____Means). Continue this process and watch the entire video with students.
  • Provide students with sentence stems and frames to support them as they jot down their ideas on the I Notice, I Wonder, I Learned worksheet. Encourage students to use complete sentences.
  • Have students turn and talk to a partner to share one thing they notice or wonder about what they saw on the video.
  • Explain to the students that today they are going to learn how to explain if a three-digit number is less than, equal to, or greater than another three-digit number. Tell them to hold on to their I Notice, I Wonder, I Learned worksheets because they will be filling out what they learned at the end of the lesson.
(5 minutes)
  • Tell the students that you want them to learn important words that will help them discuss the values of three-digit numbers.
  • Put students into six small groups and pass out one of the vocabulary cards from the Vocabulary Cards worksheet and a posterboard to each group. Make sure each group has coloring materials.
  • Read through the vocabulary cards, referring to the visuals to support student understanding. Challenge each group to create a new visual that represents their vocabulary card and draw it on their posterboard. Model an example if necessary.
  • Give students sufficient time to complete their posterboards, rotating around the classroom to provide support and guidance.
  • Allow each group to share out their completed posterboard and encourage them to justify their reasoning for using the visual with a sentence frame (i.e. We chose to draw ____Because ____.) Encourage peers to ask questions about their peer's drawings and use active questioning strategies to elicit deep thinking.
(8 minutes)
  • Project the Place Value Chart: Three-Digit Numbers on the whiteboard and get out base-ten blocks.
  • Write the following story problem next to the place value chart:
    • Tami has 236 pennies. Her friend, Malcolm, has 263 pennies. Who has more pennies?
  • Read the story problem aloud and ask students to turn and talk to a partner, sharing what the problem is asking them to figure out. Allow a few students to share their ideas.
  • Record both three-digit numbers on the place value chart, making sure the place values are aligned accurately in each column.
  • Compare the two numbers, starting in the hundreds place. Say, "I see that 236 has 2 hundreds and so does 263. Let's move on to the next place value. I see 236 has 3 tens, whereas 263 has 6 tens. Who can tell me which number is greater than the other?" Allow a few students to share out their ideas, but don't confirm who is correct yet.
  • Get out base-ten blocks to represent the two numbers, or sketch a picture of base-ten blocks next to the place value chart on the whiteboard. Confirm that 263 is greater than 236 and write "263 > 236" (using symbols) as well as "263 is greater than 236" (in sentence form) on the whiteboard.
  • Challenge students to think of another way to write the number sentence and sentence using the less than symbol (<). Remind students to refer to their Vocabulary Cards for support.
  • Allow a student to come up to the front of the room to jot down their answer. Clarify the correct answers (236 < 263 and 236 is less than 263).
  • Take the Place Value Chart: Three-Digit Numbers off the document camera/projector and project the More, Less, or the Same? worksheet (half page). Model filling out the worksheet using the numbers from the story problem. Refer to the word bank to guide you as you finish the sentence frames. Read the complete sentence frames aloud to the class.
  • Explain to the students that you are going to put them in partnerships to solve the next two story problems. Reiterate that they will use the Place Value Chart: Three Digit Numbers, base-ten blocks, and the More, Less, or the Same? worksheet as tools to compare the three-digit numbers.
(8 minutes)
  • Put students in partnerships and pass out one copy (half sheet) of the More, Less, or the Same? worksheet to each partner. Provide students with a copy of the Place Value Mat: Three-Digit Numbers and enough base-ten blocks to represent the three-digit numbers.
  • Write the following problems on the whiteboard:
    • Max has 205 colored pencils. His friend, Jasmine, has 250 colored pencils. Who has more colored pencils?
    • Layla has 147 tadpoles living in the pond behind her house. Her friend, Kai, has 147 tadpoles living in the pond behind his house. Who has more tadpoles?
  • Remind students to use their tools to solve the problem. Instruct students to work together to fill out one (half sheet) of the More, Less, or the Same? worksheet for each problem.
  • Give students enough time to solve the problems in their partnerships.

Beginning

  • Provide a word bank for students to refer to during the introduction activity with words/phrases in English and their home language (L1).
  • Define the vocabulary words in English and student's home language (L1).
  • Allow students to work in partnerships with students who speak the same L1, if possible.
  • Provide context of story problems for students by defining difficult words and showing online images (e.g. penny, tadpole, colored pencil, etc.)

Advanced

  • Instruct students to explain the steps to figure out the number that is the greatest using sequencing words.
  • Challenge students to share their answer orally to the class without relying on the sentence frames for support.
(3 minutes)
  • Rotate around the classroom as students are solving the problems in their partnerships.
  • Observe student interaction and support students when appropriate, encouraging them to justify their answers orally using the sentence frames on their worksheet.
  • Allow a partnership or two to share out their answers with the rest of the class.
(3 minutes)
  • Have students get out their I Wonder, I Notice, I Learned worksheets.
  • Instruct students to jot down 2–3 things they learned from the lesson.
  • Complete a whip-around-pass and ask students to share one thing they learned with the rest of the class.
  • Collect student worksheets.
  • Reinforce the importance of understanding how to compare numbers by providing a relevant, real-life example (for example, if you have $5, can you purchase the $6 pint of chocolate ice cream or the $3 vanilla ice cream?)

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