July 13, 2018
|
By April Brown

EL Support Lesson

Using Picture Walks to Examine Purpose

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Examining Author's Purpose in a Fictional TextLesson plan.
GradeSubjectView aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Examining Author's Purpose in a Fictional TextLesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to recount parts of a fictional text.

Language

Students will be able to recount parts of a fictional text by describing illustrations with key grade level words and phrases using sentence and paragraph frames for support.

(3 minutes)
  • Show the students the cover of the grade-appropriate fictional text. Ask the students, "Do you think this book is fiction or nonfiction? How do you know?"
  • Allow a couple of students to offer responses. Clarify that the book you chose is Fiction, meaning imaginary or pretend. Read the title of the book to the students, and allow a few students to offer predictions about what the story will be about, based on the title and illustration on the cover of the book.
  • Explain that today, they will learn about a strategy called a Picture walk. Explain to the students that a picture walk is when you use the illustrations to figure out what happens in the beginning, middle, and end of the story. This is called the story's Plot. Explain that a picture walk can also be used to figure out tricky vocabulary words and to figure out what message the author is trying to tell the reader.
  • Write and read the following language objective in student-friendly language on the board and have students choral chant the learning objective back to you:
    • I can understand a fictional text by describing illustrations with words and phrases using sentence and paragraph frames for support!
(10 minutes)
  • Tape large pieces of white paper on the walls around the classroom with the following vocabulary words written on them: Author, Illustration, Plot, Purpose, Fiction.
  • Model using a dictionary and online dictionary to figure out the meaning of the word plot. Record words and illustrations on the large piece of white paper labeled "plot" to show the students your expectation for the activity.
  • Split the students into groups of four, and assign each group one of the remaining vocabulary words. Provide various coloring materials for the students to use. Explain that they will have five minutes to use dictionaries and online dictionaries to figure out the meaning of their vocabulary words.
  • Encourage students to record words and phrases, and draw illustrations on their anchor chart to help other students understand the meaning of their given word.
  • Allow each group to present their anchor chart to the class.
  • Explain to the students that all of the vocabulary words are characteristics of a fictional text.
  • Pass out the Vocabulary Cards worksheet for students to refer to for the remainder of the lesson.
(10 minutes)
  • Gather students together and take the students on a picture walk through the fictional text you chose.
  • Write the following sentence frames on the board and use them as you model describing the illustrations to support student understanding:
    • In this picture, I see ____.
    • Based on this picture, I think the story is about ____.
  • Display a simple table with three columns on the board. Label the columns as "Beginning," "Middle," and "End."
  • Pause after reading each page so students can describe the illustrations with key grade level words and phrases.
  • Record their phrases and sentences in the corresponding column.
(10 minutes)
  • Pass out copies of the Paragraph Frame Worksheet for Fictional Text Retell to each student.
  • Direct students to paste the paragraph frames in their reading logs or journals. Project a copy of the paragraph frame on the board.
  • Finish the paragraph frame together as a class, using the table on the board for support.
  • Encourage students to help you fill in the chart, and refer back to the illustrations in the fictional text you chose as necessary to spark discussion and understanding.

BEGINNING

  • Allow students to sit at the front of the class during the picture walk.
  • Provide students with a word bank with important words and phrases they can use to fill in the sentence frames during the sentence level activity.
  • Provide students with a partially completed paragraph frame during the discourse activity.
  • Allow students to practise reading one sentence from their paragraph frame (two times) to the same partner during the formative assessment to support oral reading fluency.

ADVANCED

  • Encourage students to record their answers to the sentence starters/discussion questions in their reading logs or journals.
  • Ask students to help you fill out the table during the sentence level activity.
(4 minutes)
  • Have students read their completed paragraph frame to at least two other students in the class.
  • Collect student reading logs or journals as a formative assessment to guide future lessons on strategies to increase understanding of fictional text.
(3 minutes)
  • Have students share the answer to one of the sentence starters/discussion questions with an elbow partner:
    • Based on illustrations, I believe the author wrote the book because ____.
    • A picture walk helps me understand the message of the story because ____.
    • Why do you think the author wrote this book? How do the illustrations help your understanding?

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