July 28, 2015
|
By April Brown

Lesson plan

Place Value Hop

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Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Understanding Place ValuePre-lesson.
EL Adjustments
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Do you need extra help for EL students? Try the Understanding Place ValuePre-lesson.

Students will be able to identify different place value digits within a number.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments
(10 minutes)
  • Explain to the students that today they will be exploring place value.
  • Define Place valueAs the amount each digit in a number represents.
  • Ask a student to come up with a two-digit number. Write the number, but purposely put the digit that should be in the ones place in the tens place and the digit that should be in the tens place in the ones place.
  • Ask the students to stand up if they believe you wrote the number correctly. Call on a student to explain the mistake you made, and encourage them to use the place value blocks to show the mistake.
  • Explain to the students that when they switch the digits around in a number, the value of the number changes.
  • Tell the students that today they will play Place Value Hop to change a number's value by changing the placement of the digits in the number.
(10 minutes)
  • Pick out four numbers using the large number cards. Hold up the number cards so the students can see them.
  • Have students think-pair-share the number aloud with an elbow partner. Explain any misconceptions and read the number accurately once more.
  • Explain to the students that the numbers they see are called DigitsAnd each digit is WorthA certain amount.
  • Use the base-ten blocks and the Place Value Mat: Five Digit Numbers to explicitly show students the value of each digit in the number as it is first shown.
  • Explain to the students that you want to try to create the BiggestNumber from the four digits. Discuss how to switch around the digits to create the biggest number and show the new number using the base-ten blocks and the place value mat.
  • Repeat the same process to create the SmallestNumber, asking for student input as appropriate.
(15 minutes)
  • Get out the number cards and call four students up to the whiteboard. Ask each student to choose one of the numbers.
  • Have the students stand in a line, holding their numbers up so the class can see them. Ask another student sitting in the classroom to read the number aloud.
  • Challenge the students to see if they can make the biggest number possible by changing the order of the digits in the number. Allow the students time to discuss which students need to change places.
  • Ask the students to hop as they trade places with a peer.
  • Repeat the process, but ask students to make the smallest possible number.
  • Call up groups of four students at a time until everyone in the class has had a chance to participate.
(15 minutes)
  • Gather students together, and pass out the Place Value Hop worksheet.
  • Read the directions to the students, and tell them that they may begin.
  • Rotate around the classroom and support students as necessary.

Enrichment:For a challenge, have students create their own number cards with partners and groups and see who can make the biggest four and five-digit numbers!

Support:Students who need extra help can use the Place Value Hop #1 worksheet. This is a differentiated version that only gives students two-digit numbers to work with.

(5 minutes)
  • Have students turn in their sheets so you can assess understanding.
(5 minutes)
  • Ask one of the students to explain in their own words what they learned today.
  • Write a final set of four digits on the board.
  • Call on a student to come up and write the biggest number and the smallest number that can be made using the digits.

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