March 20, 2017
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By Lily Jones

Lesson plan

Prove It!

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Students will be able to correctly use comparative and superlative adjectives.

(5 minutes)
  • Show students three objects of different sizes.
  • Say, “Let’s put these in order from smallest to biggest.”
(10 minutes)
  • To compare these objects we can use the words “big,” “bigger,” and “biggest.”
  • We can also compare these objects using the words ”small,” “smaller,” and “smallest.”
  • Write the words “big,” “bigger,” “biggest,” “small,” “smaller, and “smallest” on the board.
  • Ask, “What do you notice about the words?” Make sure students notice that some end with “-er” and others end with “-est.”
  • Now take two of the objects and put one closer to you and one further away.
  • Say, “I can compare these objects using the words ‘close’ and ‘closer.’”
  • Tell students that you use the suffix -er when comparing two objects.
  • Now add the third object in and say, “I can compare these objects by using the suffixes -er and -est: ‘close,’ ‘closer,’ ‘closest.’”
  • Tell students that you use the suffix -est when comparing three or more objects.
(10 minutes)
  • Assign students partners and hand each pair three objects. Have the partners order the objects and label them big/bigger/biggest, small/smaller/smallest, close/closer/closest.
  • Ask students to come up with another way they could compare the objects (tall/taller/tallest, long/longer/longest, near/nearer/nearest, wide/wider/widest).
  • Have students share the different ways they could compare the objects, using comparative and superlative adjectives.
(10 minutes)
  • Tell students that comparative and superlative adjectives can be used to compare all sorts of things. For example: strange/stranger/strangest, bumpy/bumpier/bumpiest, silly/sillier/silliest, hairy/hairier/hairiest.
  • Have them pick a set of comparative and superlative adjectives and have them draw pictures that demonstrate these adjectives. They should label the pictures with the appropriate adjectives.
  • If students finish earlier, they should continue to draw sets of similar objects and compare them with comparative and superlative adjectives.

Enrichment:Have students write sentences to describe the objects they draw.

Support:Have students work only with comparative adjectives.

(5 minutes)
  • Assess students’ understanding by observing how they are are using comparative and superlative adjectives.
  • Look at the work they produce during independent work time and assess their ability to correctly form and use comparative and superlative adjectives.
(5 minutes)
  • Have students share the drawings they did during independent work time, using the adjectives they wrote in complete sentences.

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